HYT H3 Replica Watches UK: futuristic breakout

— Instead of evolution we get revolution. The H3 changes everything you thought you knew about HYT. The linear satellite combination truly opens a new era in fluid mechanics.


The main drawback of a promise is that you have to keep it. When HYT burst onto the watchmaking scene three years ago, Vincent Perriard unveiled a dizzying roadmap: a new model every year with a progressive surge in capability.

H1 came out to a thunderstruck reception. The hydro-mechanical timepiece reinvented watchmaking by transforming not only the indication of time but also the accepted construction of a Swiss replica watches movement.

With H2, HYT demonstrated that it had mastered the technology introduced in the H1. H3 was therefore eagerly awaited. Some guessed it would be another version of the H1, while others expected a complete breakaway. The latter turned out to be correct.

One before and one after H3     

The watch overturns all the brand’s perceived concepts with a new case, a new movement and a new way of showing time. The H3 is not so much a new development as an ex nihilo creation. The only thing that remains the same is HYT’s trademark yellowish green fluid.

In essence the Rolex replica UK watch no longer shows the time in a circle but in a straight line. The retrograde component in the movement now manifests itself on a dial in which hours and minutes are completely divorced. The transmission is fundamentally new since the two pistons are now opposed horizontally.

“Our clear intention is to become even more revolutionary,” declares CEO, Vincent Perriard. “We can go much further in the development of HYT in terms of mechanics, hydraulics and fun.  We worked for 18 months on this project, which gave us a technological leap forward. We have almost become glassworkers capable of making our capillary tubes in any shape you like.”

A matter of torque

Once again the main challenge of the H3 is in its motor power. H1 solved the problem of a steady torque from two pistons; the H2 managed to deliver the power from two pistons set at 45°; the Skull combined these two features to drive the fluid through a capillary with angles. Today the H3 with its two opposed pistons once more had to overcome power and torque issues. “That is one of the main challenges of HYT calibres as a whole,” admits Vincent Perriard. “The H3 demonstrates that perfectly and we are already working on movements that go beyond our current limits.”

H3.
© HYT

The end customer soon finds his way around the time. A four-sided piece, rotating horizontally, shows the day in six-hour periods. The position of the fluid above the bar shows the precise hour. At the end of every six-hour period the dial rotates a quarter turn and the liquid withdraws to its point of departure in a retrograde move.

Just below, the minutes are also indicated linearly. A double articulated arm shows the exact minute on a segment scale of 60. At the end of its cycle it too returns to start.

Setting all these indications to the right time is done intuitively and simply by pressing a button. Each time the button is pressed, the 6-hour bar rotates once, allowing the wearer to jump to the right period of the day. Then, by turning the crown the hour and  minutes can be set precisely.

H3.
© HYT

The H3 comes in an imposing 62 x 41 mm titanium case and will be initially limited to 25 watches.

Growing family

At the same time, the H2 reappears in two new cases. The first, called H2 Full Gun, will be available as a limited edition of 15 with a titanium case with a gunmetal PVD coating. The other version has a bronze coating on the same base.

The H2 thus confirms its potential. It’s one of HYT’s best sellers: the brand sold more than 450 H1 and H2 replica watches in 2014. “That turned out to be a record year for us and we’re now working on building up our network. We opened our first boutique in Kuala Lumpur, immediately followed by an amazing showroom in Singapore. And the momentum will continue in America with a similar project in Miami,” concludes Vincent Perriard.